What advice might you give a research firm like ours as we begin this study?

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Gen Z has grown accustomed to expect individualized messaging, incentives, and targeting. For a study requiring insights from this group, I believe focus groups or any interview-style research method would be more effective than, say, an email survey. These methods will allow for deeper probing as well as give interviewees a sense that their individual opinions are valued, which will ultimately open them up more. 


Yale Buchwald.png

You should do some studies with Gen Z particularly pertaining to Instagram. So much is going on in that space for Gen Z that it would be useful to have a cohesive study on their habits using Instagram. 


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As you begin to construct your study, start looking in unexpected places for Gen Z-ers. Try and find subcommunities on Tumblr even try apps like Depop. I also think it’s important to not feel the need to look for data that has already been published. I think if your research firm does a good job of finding respondents from a wealth of backgrounds you might be surprised about what you’ll hear. Ultimately, your study will be much more valuable if there are nuggets that haven’t been unearthed by other firms. 


Christine Goncalves.jpg

I would consider organizing focus groups to learn more about the Gen-Z cohort. I feel as though online studies and surveys may only provide so much insight; however, face-to-face conversations with this generation may serve as a useful tool moving forward in your research studies. Also, members of generation-z tend to “skip” over content they are not interested in or that does not personally pertain to them, so if you do decide to distribute online surveys, maybe incentivizing completing the survey with something that would be of interest to participants, on a more personal level, would be appropriate.